Florian Karsten Typefaces

Purchase Free Trials
Variable Static
Pixels
0
Joints
100
Leading
1.00
Tracking
0.000 %
AA Aa
Ligatures
AA Aa
Size
5.60 vw
Leading
1.20
Tracking
0.025 %
Columbia was named after the American sloop Columbia Rediviva which, from 1787 to 1793, under the command of Captain Robert Gray, explored the US Pacific Northwest and became the first American vessel to circumnavigate the globe. It is also named after the command module of Apollo 11, the first crewed landing on another celestial body. Columbia was also the female symbol of the United States. After construction, the orbiter arrived at Kennedy Space Center on March 25, 1979, to prepare for its first launch. Columbia was originally scheduled to lift off in late 1979, however the launch date was delayed by problems with both the RS-25 engine, as well as the thermal protection system. The first flight of Columbia was commanded by John Young, a veteran from the Gemini and Apollo programs who was the ninth person to walk on the Moon in 1972, and piloted by Robert Crippen, a rookie astronaut originally selected to fly on the military's Manned Orbital Laboratory spacecraft, but transferred to NASA after its cancellation, and served as a support crew member for the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Columbia spent 610 days in the Orbiter Processing Facility, another 35 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building, and 105 days on Pad 39A before finally lifting off. It was successfully launched on April 12, 1981, the 20th anniversary of the first human spaceflight (Vostok 1), and returned on April 14, 1981, after orbiting the Earth 36 times, landing on the dry lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California. It then undertook three further research missions to test its technical characteristics and performance. Its first operational mission, with a four-man crew, launched on November 11, 1982. At this point Columbia was joined by Challenger, which flew the next three shuttle missions, while Columbia underwent modifications for the first Spacelab mission. In 1983, Columbia, under the command of John Young on what was his sixth spaceflight, undertook its second operational mission, in which the Spacelab science laboratory and a six-person crew was carried, including the first non-American astronaut on a space shuttle, Ulf Merbold. After the flight, it spent 18 months at the Rockwell Palmdale facility beginning in January 1984, undergoing modifications that removed the Orbiter Flight Test hardware and updating it to similar specifications as those of its sister orbiters.
AA Aa
Size
1.75 vw
Leading
1.45
Tracking
0.065 %
Een van de redenen voor het gebruik van de naam Pioneer lag in het feit dat deze vlucht bedoeld was om de weg te effenen voor zwaardere verkenners. De constructeurs wisten niet goed wat de ideale vormgeving voor zo'n sonde moest zijn, doordat er tot die tijd slechts zeer weinig bekend was over de stralingsgordels van de buitenplaneten en de intensiteit van micrometeorieten. De Pioneer 10 en 11 moesten hieromtrent duidelijkheid verschaffen. Beide sondes voerden camera's mee, maar het maken van opnames was niet het belangrijkste missiedoel. De vaartuigen beschikten over sensors die magnetische velden, geladen deeltjes en samenstelling en temperatuur van Jupiter vastlegden. De verzonden foto's waren een bijproduct van metingen door een polarimeter, ontworpen door de Nederlandse hoogleraar Tom Gehrels van de Universiteit van Arizona. Overigens zouden verreweg de meeste toekomstige plannen vroegtijdig sneuvelen op de tekentafel: door voortdurende bezuinigingen moest NASA in de jaren na Pioneer 10 keuzes maken. Hun voortdurend door uitstel en budgetoverschrijdingen geplaagde paradepaardje Space Shuttle slokte het leeuwendeel van de beschikbare fondsen op en na Voyager 1 en 2 maakte NASA noodgedwongen pas op de plaats. Voor communicatie met de vluchtleiding op Aarde beschikte de sonde over drie antennes: een hooggevoelige schotelantenne met een diepte van 46 cm en een diameter van 2,74 m en daarnaast een middelgevoelige antenne op de schotelantenne en een laaggevoelige antenne die 76 cm van het deel met de vluchtinstrumenten uitstak en onder de schotelantenne was bevestigd. Van de twee ontvangers was er een aangesloten op zowel de laag- als middelgevoelige antenne, de andere was gereserveerd voor de schotelantenne. De vluchtleiding kon deze omwisselen. Twee zenders met versterkers van 8 watt op 2292 MHz zonden gegevens naar de Aarde, inkomende signalen kwamen binnen op 2110 MHz. De bitrate bedroeg op weg naar Jupiter 2048 bps en aan het einde van de missie slechts 16 bps. Op 750 miljoen km doet een radiosignaal er zo'n 40 minuten over om deze afstand te overbruggen.
AA Aa
Size
4 vw
Leading
1.15
Tracking
0.020 %
After separation from the launch vehicle, overall control was taken by Mission Operations Center at the Applied Physics Laboratory in Howard County, Maryland. The science instruments are operated at Clyde Tombaugh Science Operations Center in Boulder, Colorado. Navigation is performed at various contractor facilities, whereas the navigational positional data and related celestial reference frames are provided by the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station through Headquarters NASA and JPL; KinetX is the lead on the New Horizons navigation team and is responsible for planning trajectory adjustments as the spacecraft speeds toward the outer Solar System. Coincidentally the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station was where the photographic plates were taken for the discovery of Pluto's moon Charon; and the Naval Observatory is itself not far from the Lowell Observatory where Pluto was discovered. New Horizons was originally planned as a voyage to the only unexplored planet in the Solar System. When the spacecraft was launched, Pluto was still classified as a planet, later to be reclassified as a dwarf planet by the International Astronomical Union. Some members of the New Horizons team, including Alan Stern, disagree with the IAU definition and still describe Pluto as the ninth planet. Pluto's satellites Nix and Hydra also have a connection with the spacecraft: the first letters of their names are the initials of New Horizons. The moons' discoverers chose these names for this reason, plus Nix and Hydra's relationship to the mythological Pluto. In addition to the science equipment, there are several cultural artifacts traveling with the spacecraft. These include a collection of 434,738 names stored on a compact disc, a piece of Scaled Composites's SpaceShipOne, a "Not Yet Explored" USPS stamp, and a Flag of the United States, along with other mementos. About 30 grams (1 oz) of Clyde Tombaugh's ashes are aboard the spacecraft, to commemorate his discovery of Pluto in 1930. A Florida-state quarter coin, whose design commemorates human exploration, is included, officially as a trim weight. One of the science packages (a dust counter) is named after Venetia Burney, who, as a child, suggested the name "Pluto" after its discovery.

FK Raster Roman is a pixel-based serif typeface, sharpest at the 12-pixel size. Its Compact variant partially abandons the pixel grid and serves as a tightly spaced display typeface, carefully kerned to leave no superfluous gaps. The variable font smoothly transitions between sharp, pixelated form to completely rounded shapes, creating strong contrasts between the two states.

FK Raster Roman supports Latin Extended-A character set (i.e. Western European, Central European and Southeastern European languages) and several OpenType features. For complete specs see typeface specimen.

  • Designer

    Květoslav Bartoš

  • Publisher

    Florian Karsten Typefaces

  • Release date

    September 2020

  • Version

    1.0.0 (September 2020)

  • Formats

    Static (OTF, TTF, WOFF, WOFF2), Variable (TTF, WOFF, WOFF2)

  • Glyphs

    484

  • OpenType features

    Standard Ligatures, Case Sensitive Forms, Fractions, Numerators, Denominators, Scientific Inferiors, Superscript, Subscript, Oldstyle Figures, Lining Figures, Proportional Figures, Tabular Figures, Slashed Zero

  • Language support

    Afrikaans, Albanian, Asturian, Azerbaijani, Basque, Bemba, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Cornish, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Galician, Ganda, German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Kinyarwanda, Klingon, Latvian, Lithuanian, Luxembourgish, Makhuwa, Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Romansh, Sango, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian, Shona, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Swiss German, Turkish, Uzbek, Welsh, Zarma, Zulu

  • Licensing

    A basic license purchased via this website combines desktop and web license and covers installation on a given number of workstations within one organisation and allows you to self-host webfont files for a single domain with no time limitation for a given number of unique visitors per month. For more information about other licensing options, please check FAQ or get in touch.

Buy FK Raster Roman

Basic desktop + web license (up to 3 CPU, single domain up to 10k visitors/month)
For more information about other licensing options please check FAQ or get in touch.

  • {{ family.packageinfo }}

All prices exclude VAT. Non-EU customers are not charged VAT. EU customers are charged their local VAT unless they provide a valid VAT ID during the checkout process, in which case they are charged 0% VAT. Czech customers without valid VAT ID may contact us directly via e-mail. For more information about our VAT policy please see FAQ.

Cart

  • Your cart is empty
  • {{ font.name }}{{ font.price }} Eur
Subtotal{{ subfinalPrice }} Eur
+{{ desktopDiff }} Eur
+{{ webDiff }} Eur

Don’t see a license you need or need to upgrade an existing license? We offer app, embed, broadcast, corporate licenses and other options upon request. Contact us directly at fonts@floriankarsten.com.

Total{{ finalPrice }} Eur
{{ errormessage }}

*) Required field, please enter a valid information in order to continue.

Processing...Proceed to checkout

You will be automatically redirected to a third-party checkout process. All major credit cards accepted. After you finish payment you will receive an e-mail containing purchased items. If you have any questions or difficulties regarding our payment process please contact us via e-mail.

By purchasing a license for our font software you agree to the End User License Agreement.